Bet Angel for newbies / Getting started : Racing class??

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Original-Soultrader
Posts: 67
Joined: Mon Mar 27, 2017 12:19 am

Mon Feb 26, 2018 5:22 pm

In Peter's video's he talks a lot about the 'class of race' - like theres an a rated race, b rated etc - what does he mean by this and how would a newbie know? (or learn)

Right now they are just races to me :D

Halliday
Posts: 327
Joined: Sun Jun 12, 2016 3:40 pm

Mon Feb 26, 2018 5:53 pm

Original-Soultrader wrote:
Mon Feb 26, 2018 5:22 pm
In Peter's video's he talks a lot about the 'class of race' - like theres an a rated race, b rated etc - what does he mean by this and how would a newbie know? (or learn)

Right now they are just races to me :D
Flat Racing Classifications
Group One, Two and Three Races: These are the real top level events. Group One races are the highest class of race run in the UK, they include the 1,000 Guineas, the 2,000 Guineas, the Derby, the Oaks and the St Leger. Together these five races are known as the Classics of the British flat racing season. All horses carry the same weight in these top-class races regardless of their official rating (though fillies and mares generally get a small weight allowance in races in which they run against colts and geldings). Here we get to really see who the best of the best is.

Listed Races: Races contested by horses just below Group class. These can be either handicap or non-handicap events.

Conditions Stakes: Races for which the weight is determined by the age and sex of the runner rather than the official rating. Colts and geldings carry more weight than fillies and mares. Older horses carry more weight than younger animals by virtue of having reached a greater physical maturity.

Classified Stakes: For horses who have run at least three times or run twice with at least one win. Restricted to animals with a rating at or below a specified figure. Horses above the specified rating are permitted to enter, but the excess of their rating must be carried as additional weight.

Maiden: This is where the majority of horses start their racing careers. Maidens are races for horses who have never won a race and are predominantly races for two-year-olds. Any horse who wins a maiden is automatically given a rating making them eligible for handicaps. For those runners who don’t manage to win, three maiden runs are required before a rating is assigned.

Auction Maiden: A maiden race restricted to those horses to have been sold at public auction for a value not exceeding a specified amount.

Median Auction Maiden: These are restricted maidens. They are open to any two-year-old whose sire has produced two or more yearlings to have been sold at auction in the previous year. The median price of these sales must not exceed a specified amount.

Nursery: A handicap for two-year-olds.

Maiden Handicap: For maidens aged three and upwards with a maximum rating of 70. Each runner must also have run a minimum of four times.

Novice: Open to two or three-year-olds who have not won more than twice.

Novice Auction: A novice race restricted to horses sold at public auction for a value not exceeding a specified amount.

Claiming Stakes: In these races the BHA sets the maximum weight a horse may carry. They also set a maximum and minimum claim price for the race. Connections then determine how much weight they would like their runner to carry. There is a penalty however, for every pound below the maximum weight, there is a corresponding decrease in the claiming price. For example a horse carrying the maximum weight in a claiming race with a maximum claiming price of £14,000 would cost £14,000. In our example race the penalty for reducing the weight by one pound is a £1,000 lowering of the claiming price. So, if connections of another horse in the race opted to reduce the weight carried by their runner by seven pounds, then it could be claimed (bought) after the race for £7,000.

Seller: After these races the winner is offered for public auction.

Apprentice: Restricted to apprentice jockeys. When competing against professional jockeys, apprentices are allowed to reduce the weight carried by their mount. This is known as an apprentices allowance and can vary from 3-10lbs. No allowances can be claimed in an apprentice only race.

Amateurs: Restricted to amateur jockeys.

Ladies: Restricted to female amateurs and apprentices.

Gentleman: Restricted to male amateurs

Handicaps: Those races where the weight carried is determined by the official rating of the horse. Handicaps are grouped into classes, with class one being for the highest rated and class seven for the lowest.

Class 1 Listed Handicaps for horses rated 96-110+.
Class 2 This includes the Heritage Handicaps. The rating bands for this class are 86-100, 91-105 and 96-110.
Class 3 The ratings band for this class are 76-90 and 81-95
Class 4 For horses rated 66-80 and 71-85
Class 5 For horses rated 56-70 and 61-75
Class 6 For horses rated 46-60 and 51-65.
Class 7 Generally these are classified stakes races for horses rated 0-45.


BHA Classification of National Hunt races http://rules.britishhorseracing.com/Ord ... 11&depth=4

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SeaHorseRacing
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Joined: Fri May 20, 2016 7:06 pm

Mon Feb 26, 2018 7:12 pm

Might be useful if this one was pinned as seen this question asked a few times over the years and Halliday probably spent all day typing it. :D

Halliday
Posts: 327
Joined: Sun Jun 12, 2016 3:40 pm

Mon Feb 26, 2018 7:15 pm

SeaHorseRacing wrote:
Mon Feb 26, 2018 7:12 pm
Might be useful if this one was pinned as seen this question asked a few times over the years and Halliday probably spent all day typing it. :D
As if .. it was post the link or copy and paste !!!

Original-Soultrader
Posts: 67
Joined: Mon Mar 27, 2017 12:19 am

Mon Feb 26, 2018 7:53 pm

Errm, im sure that this one is a stupid question, but here goes....

What does it mean for us?

Is it all about how much money they attract?

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SeaHorseRacing
Posts: 2345
Joined: Fri May 20, 2016 7:06 pm

Mon Feb 26, 2018 8:26 pm

Original-Soultrader wrote:
Mon Feb 26, 2018 7:53 pm
Errm, im sure that this one is a stupid question, but here goes....

What does it mean for us?

Is it all about how much money they attract?
"Generally" the better quality races are going to be more stable (less volatile) than the weaker races.

As a rule of thumb but I certainly encourage you to do your research. Weaker races move more than high-quality races, however, the shorter the price of the favourite the more volatile it could become. Again not an exact science. Very short prices like 1.10 are sometimes unlikely to move at all.

Different types of races trade differently, Handicaps are generally exposed races, so efficient and less likely to move in price, whereas a juvenile or maiden is relying on information "in the know" so money talks and far more likely to get a moving price.

It takes time too, after a few years, even in a race where you would expect a big move, you come to market and your like "ive seen this before" it does something thats not expected and you knew it was coming. This is something I have probably only picked up over last 6 months, but I have probably traded nearly 20,000 horse racing markets now. But if you do your research and note each type of market your have a rough idea what should be done very very quickly.

Try and get into the habit of thinking what markets should I not even consider, this includes "different" countries, as for some they can be a pain. For example, Irish maidens and high-quality racing is like my favourite thing to trade, however, the in-between Irish markets and your Friday night at Dundalk should be avoided like the plague.

Think about the time aswell, This time of year most traders are unlikely to get stuck into a market unless there's 2 mins on the clock until the races (unless your name is Peter) whereas in the summer im active around 6/7 mins to post.
Cheltenham festival I may start trading the race an hour before.

Take note of these ideas and research them to help you.

Halliday
Posts: 327
Joined: Sun Jun 12, 2016 3:40 pm

Mon Feb 26, 2018 9:18 pm

Original-Soultrader wrote:
Mon Feb 26, 2018 7:53 pm
Errm, im sure that this one is a stupid question, but here goes....

What does it mean for us?

Is it all about how much money they attract?
The time of year / quality/ competitiveness of racing and type of race meeting affect the liquidity of the markets .. sure If you check Peter's Blog there is a piece on this

Halliday
Posts: 327
Joined: Sun Jun 12, 2016 3:40 pm

Mon Feb 26, 2018 9:21 pm

Halliday wrote:
Mon Feb 26, 2018 9:18 pm
Original-Soultrader wrote:
Mon Feb 26, 2018 7:53 pm
Errm, im sure that this one is a stupid question, but here goes....

What does it mean for us?

Is it all about how much money they attract?
The time of year / quality/ competitiveness of racing and type of race meeting affect the liquidity of the markets .. sure If you check Peter's Blog there is a piece on this
But my advice would be to keep it simple and dont complicate things .. the most important thing is entry/ exit and executing your trade

Class/ value etc are more important if your " backing horses " rather than trading

Original-Soultrader
Posts: 67
Joined: Mon Mar 27, 2017 12:19 am

Mon Feb 26, 2018 10:18 pm

Excellent and really useful answers.

Thank you all.

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